Greater Manchester

SmartHearts

Using Data to Improve Care for People with Health Failure

Around 1,000 people with heart failure in Greater Manchester are part of a trial to have data from their existing implanted device (e.g. pacemakers and defibrillators) capture information about their health as part of the Smart Hearts project.

The clinical team at Manchester Heart Centre (Manchester Royal Infirmary) are working closely with Medtronic, the company which provides the devices, to use the data to try and detect signs of deterioration earlier and to transform care for the patient.

By identifying problems earlier, interventions can be put in place to provide people with appropriate heart failure therapies to avoid their condition further deteriorating.

Around 2,500 patients in Greater Manchester with heart failure have implantable devices (pacemakers or defibrillators) which already transmit heart health data onto a cloud platform. Our industry, academic and health and care partners are using an algorithm to detect early deterioration from data from approximately 1,000 patients and their devices. The data flows in near real time into a new operating model for treating heart failure at home.

The Smart Hearts project aims to demonstrate improved outcomes for patients by detecting early deterioration and preventing hospital admissions. Data is being used to demonstrate the efficacy of the intervention and run machine learning algorithms to improve prediction of heart failure.

We’re also using real world evidence and artificial intelligence (AI) to look for missed opportunities for implantable devices and to accelerate the deployment of devices to a wider population suitable for these treatments.

Transforming the heart failure care pathway: key data and information

  • 920,000 people in the UK have heart failure
  • £16.4 million – cost to Greater Manchester Clinical Commissioning Groups per year.
  • 34,000 bed days per year in Greater Manchester
  • 4,300 hospital admissions in Greater Manchester per year.
Defibrillator
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